Review: Deliver Us From Evil

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If you picked a movie from a certain genre that I was most likely to enjoy or appreciate, it would probably be religious-horror. I can’t believe in zombies or monster spiders but demonic possession is entirely different. You may not want to believe it is real but as someone with several friends in the ghost-hunting and supernatural field, I’m a firm believer that this is very possible. The new Eric Bana movie is an approach on just that – demon possessions. The movie ends up being strong in many regards with several weak points. Let’s discuss.

Eric Bana plays a New Yawker with a mega-heavy accent, trying to sound as much like a Yankee as he can. Perhaps one of the most annoying accents is that Brooklyn/Bronx shit. But he does a fine job portraying an NYPD detective who investigated some wild possession-like events. The movie features tons of f-bombs and cursing since that is how people from the northeast talk (and behave – no morals). And the movie is based on accounts from a former police officer. That is supposed to lend additional credibility to the background, except for one problem:

Most cops are idiots.

Think about the last time you encountered a cop who wow’ed you with his wit. Never? In your dreams? Or recently? Because if it were recently, that is probably because you’re kind of dumb. Cops generally aren’t the brightest bunch so hearing one tell me that he saw demons and stuff doesn’t do much for me, in the field of belief. True, I might take him more seriously than a crack whore or Illuminati nut but just barely.

Bana and Joel McHale (who I almost didn’t recognize and who also did a fantastic job) are typical adrenaline junkie cops anxious to violate someone’s rights. Bana actually beats a man to death at one point. The two end up on an investigation with paranormal implications. As the movie progresses, we discover that the possessions seem centered around some soldiers who served in Iraq in 2010 and became possessed. Besides cops, if you asked me to name a group of people who were likely unintelligent, guess who I would say?

Soldiers.

No one goes into that field because they’re overflowing with intellect. I appreciate what they do in the figurative sense but anytime I hear someone thank a soldier, I’m always thinking the soldier is quietly saying to himself, “Why are you thanking me, dumbass? I took this job because it was guaranteed pay and I didn’t have any other options.”

Now, I was enjoying the movie well enough when all of a sudden, one of my least-favorite faces popped up:

trash
trash

That’s right. The Hollywood whore herself, Olivia Munn is in this movie. Upon her sight, this sound effect played in my head:

Olivia Munn is not attractive, at all, yet believes she is. She’s a skank grit who has several nude photos lingering around the Internet, including one with her old sick gash having meat stuffed up in it, courtesy of the Fappening. GROSS. She also has flop tits. So I can’t take any movie seriously that portrays her as anything except for a gypsy.

The movie progresses despite her, with the main protagonist looking strangely similar to Eric Bana. I thought they were actually going to say they were the same person, at one point. Not the case, though. Just bad casting. But the story remains fairly strong and even at the end, with the predictable exorcism, it finishes “ok.” I’m left to wonder how much of this really was based on a true story and if a “possessed man” actually kidnapped Bana’s family, or if that was just BS added to the movie to make it “interesting” at the end.

The movie ends without much of a conclusion, although the general idea is that the man was possessed, Bana’s cop character finally believed this stuff was real and he left his job to pursue that line of work.

This movie ends up being a solid effort if you are interested in this genre (spiritual horror). However, points are lost for Olivia Munn and for the Yankee accent.

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